Welcome to the Card Tower

We at Card Tower are very pleased that you have dropped by. Please take some time to look through our various features. All images and text are my copyright but if you would like to make use of something on the site you must ask for permission. If we have helped you in any way, then please consider a donation, no matter how small, which will help us add new material to the site.

Our articles are 95% game-related and often offer a quirky look at games. Currently, articles include reviews, artwork, and humourous looks at the world of gaming.

Our 'Books, Magazines and Catalogues' archive features all sorts of ephemera about games. Books and magazines, of course, but also catalogues, and so on. Use our exclusive 'Look Inside' feature that offers you the chance to look inside the various entries. Haven't you always wished to take a peek inside the covers of a vintage catalogue that you have seen elsewhere on the intenet? Well, now you can. This feature is in its infancy but we add to it almost every day.

Our 'Comical Games' archive features games that are not really games, but do provide many hours of entertainment (the same as a game in that regard).

Our 'Looking for Rules?' archive includes many examples of rules to mostly vintage games. Download them as you need them. Plus, we intend to add rules for 'public domain' type games such as party games (Blind Man's Bluff, Treasure Hunts, etc.).

Subscribers are very welcome. Our secure server will keep your email details very safe (my developer says it is the same system used by the White House in America!). But, please note, we cannot accept Hotmail in any subscriber's email address due to heavy amounts of spam submissions. Sorry to all 'Hotmailers' out there.

Our friends at Abacus have helped us with their support. Please check out their site by clicking on their logo below. It is well worth a visit. Now, enjoy your visit to Card-Tower.

 

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When Dungeons & Dragons appeared in England, Terrence Donnelly saw that there might be a gap in the market for a family fantasy board game. So he approached Philmar and they took a chance on The Sorcerer’s Cave. I said taking a chance because Donnelly’s game was unlike any other game produced...
Tom Schoeps’  DAS LETZTE KAMEL was published by FX Schmid in 1989. It is a race game but with a difference. You want your  camel to come last. I can’t recall if that was very novel in 1989, maybe it was because I imported it and found lots of buyers. My member of staff, Andy, even translated the...
Doing a lot of work in September so no time foir a review or similar. A very good friend here has sent me 180kg of catalogues, flyers,  press releases and magazines. They came in 18 boxes that weighed 10kg each. The picture alongside shows some of the distribtion and organisation but I had only...
It was with some sadness that today I learned that Richard Sharp had died in 2003. Whilst I worked in the Games Centre shop in London, I met Richard. It was obvious then that he was very intelligent and bursting with ideas. 7 or 8 years later he wrote one o0f the finest books ever written about...
A LOOK AT THE CHARACTERS IN 'THE VOYAGES OF MARCO POLO', published by Hans im Glück Marco Polo, not to be confused with his English half-brother Minto Polo, was a 13th century merchant who opened up China and the Far East for trade with the west. This game reflects his travels as players lbuild...
It is June 2016. The weather here is best described as wet and warm. Warm enough to sit in my Strandkorb and watch Helga mowing the lawn (Helga has a terrific work ethic and who am I to stop such leanings?). Whilst sitting there a couple of days ago, my thoughts naturally led me to Christmas. I...
The first game I ever purchased with my own money, (i.e. not a game bought for the family), was Totopoly. My paper round circa 1960 gave me a little to spend each week. I cannot recall where I bought it, certainly not in a shop, much more likely in a Jumble Sale (Car Boot Fairs and Charity Shops...
This month we discovered a new game (which wasn’t very new, it was just new to us). Isle of Skye slipped under the radar, not only for us but many around the gaming community seemed to have missed it too. Isle of Skye may have suffered because at a quick glance it looks like a Carcassonne spin-off...
If you've ever watched Star Trek, you will recall the 3D chess game set up in Captain Kirk's quarters, The producers obviously thought that in a further two millenia no new game would be developed in all those years. But, in 1981, there was a new 3D game called Taliesin. The board is circular and...
Schmidt have added another game to their range of games that they hope will appeal to the gaming community rather than just families. We love Vienna so we were keen to try something new. The new game turned out to be Mount Drago. Schmidt published it in 2011 and it has definitely slipped under the...

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